Charlie, are you kidding me?

BismiLlah al-Rahman al-Raheem,

It happened again. Charlie Hebdo, a french satirical magazine, did a special issue called “Charia Hebdo” claiming that  a character supposedly our Prophet (pbuh) is its editor-in-chief. “100 lashes for those who don’t laugh” says a bearded man with a turban on the cover (guess who?).
To keep it short, and we mentioned it God knows how many times that this is typical. It’s like an old joke, a broken record. Get over it.
The problem is, once the issue came out, the next night, the Charlie Hebdo HQ were burnt down to the ground. (Note: they still don’t know who did it, but they assume it’s the Muslim extremists)

Unfortunately it is that kind of bad humour that gives the extremists an opportunity to cross the line. They’re just giving them a free pass for trouble.
And people like Professor Tariq Ramadan have to go on shows repeating millions of times that this is not what Islam stands for, and it goes against our Shariah (Charia if you’d like), etc. It’s like erasing all the interfaith dialogues and making the Islamic da’ias and scholars start from scratch. It’s growing enmity between religions, widening the gap between each other.
Thank you extremists. Thank you Charlie.

Someone tells me that only Muslims are not allowed to draw the Prophet (pbuh) but non-Muslims can, it’s freedom of expression!
No it’s not, it’s called insulting, it’s called you not getting that with your freedom comes the others’ as well. It’s called you being responsible enough to not reach others’ freedom of belief. It’s you being intolerant and narrow-minded.
Would you like me to stick your head on a donkey and publish it for the whole word to see? Haha you say?
Others will say: well, about Jesus (as)? You don’t say anything when he’s on the cover of a satirical magazine!
Well we should.

We should make it loud and clear that making fun about people is of bad taste. Drawing silly caricatures is like ghiba, backbiting. I’m sick and tired of people pointing fingers, making fun, childishly criticizing each other.
Basta.

Must read article: http://blogs.mediapart.fr/blog/halluka/071111/charlie-hebdo-bonbing-who-reaping-benefits

~ by youngmuslimworld on November 9, 2011.

One Response to “Charlie, are you kidding me?”

  1. Dear Friends,

    Thank you for posting review of Deserts and Mountains on this page.

    Please feel free to share the link to full e-copy of Deserts and Mountains with your readers at no cost.
    Knowledge is and should be something that is available free of charge whenever possible. This is an important Muslim/Sufi tradition.
    http://yilmazalimoglu.com/2011/12/17/free-full-e-copy-of-deserts-and-mountains/

    Here is a note.

    Jalaluddin Rumi saw love as the foundation of all reality, and though his words are simple, the thoughts they provoke can support lifetimes of contemplation: “With passion pray. With passion work. With passion make love. With passion eat and drink and dance and play. Why look like a dead fish in this ocean of God?” This was Rumi’s magic, his experience of love as a serious force in the world, not fancy or folly.

    A devout Muslim, Rumi found himself drawn to the deep inner life of Sufism. A Sufi is part monk, part poet, part wanderer, and fully devoted in heart and practice to the precepts of unconditional love. It’s a high ideal, and Rumi, if his poetry is any indication, fulfilled it. It is important to understand Rumi, especially these days because he teaches us that religious experience is about love, not hating one another. Rumi basically teaches us that we can be different from each other but we can still live in peace and harmony.

    I recognizes that starting at birth we grow into a culture through assimilation into a certain life, without choice. Slowly we learn to make our own choices. Even when we begin to evaluate our choices that act is influenced by our upbringing and the environment in which we live. The Sufi way has been my lifestyle by choice over the last several years. It is the sweetest and most beautiful path I can ever imagine. Life is very painful without the joy that comes from experiencing faith.

    Yilmaz Alimoglu

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